Riding With the Wind



Comments (7)

  1. Paul Brown says:

    When you consider original cost, maintenance, serious weather conditions and insurance it is nowhere near free power.

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    Shelley Goldberg Reply:

    Thank you for your insightful comment. There is no perfect energy and not all energy sources are found or can function everywhere. Solar power in Seattle is not likely, nor is drilling for oil and gas in Boston. Wind power functions in many but not all locations.

    Yes, all energy sources require maintenance and upkeep. But from an environmental and safety standard, wind is far better than fossil fuels. I am surely not advocating an end to fossil fuels as that argument is neither feasible or realistic now and likely for many years ahead.

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  2. James Kutz says:

    Who is picking up the cost of building these generators and at the rent on the land that these generators set on?

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  3. Miner49er says:

    When subsidies & mandates disappear, wind power dies. And they WILL disappear, because ratepayers & taxpayers won’t put up with them.

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  4. prs says:

    Nothing was discussed as to where the power must come from when the wind isn’t blowing, which on the average is 65% of the time…

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  5. John Quartermain says:

    I think you should check your sources on the 2.35 cents a kWh. The cost per kWh in Germany is 35 cents a kWh and the UK is 24 cents a kWh. A low “generation only” cost for wind energy sold to utilities is 8 cents a kWh with some utilities paying as much as 14 cents per kw for “generation only”. Another drawback is that unlike other sources you are required to purchase 100% of what is generated whether you need it or not resulting in purchasing power in the early morning hours when there is no demand for this energy.

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    Shelley Goldberg Reply:

    Thank you for your comments. To clarify some of the statistics, the 2.35 cents per kWh in the US comes from a new report released by the U.S. Department of Energy and prepared by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). More specifically, the report says,

    – Wind PPA prices have reached all-time lows. After topping out at nearly $70/MWh for PPAs executed in 2009, the national average levelized price of wind PPAs that were signed in 2014 (and that are within the Berkeley Lab sample) fell to around $23.5/MWh nationwide—a new low, but admittedly focused on a sample of projects that largely hail from the lowest-priced Interior region of the country.

    The issue of wind being the cheapest energy source in Germany and the U.K. comes from Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

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