Bearing the Weight of the Clean Power Plan



Comments (4)

  1. Brian Zeebeck says:

    It is very frustrating to see yet another writer drinking the koolaid of CO2 being harmful. It is a natural occuring element all plantlife requires.
    Mark my words: the day will come when the consensus will be that CO2 is good and that we have some other item that will be used to tax away our wealth and keep us all worried.
    I will always remember what the headlines were in the 1970s. “The world is cooling and we have an impending ice age coming”.
    There is no manmade global change/warming!

    [Reply]

    Samantha Solomon

    Samantha Solomon Reply:

    Hi Brian, thanks for your comment. Yes, to get any value out of my article, one first must accept the belief that the increased CO2 generated by modern industry is harmful to the environment.

    Increased is the important word to note here. As you say, CO2 is a naturally occurring element that is absorbed by plant life, which uses it to create other elements, such as oxygen. However, the amount of CO2 humans are producing through power plants, cars, industry, etc. are too high for the natural cycle to convert all of it. The cycle is out of balance, there is an excess amount of CO2, and it is having an adverse effect on our atmosphere.

    [Reply]

  2. Gordon Kitchens says:

    You said “switching from fossil fuels to natural gas will require billions in infrastructure investments…” Sorry, Samantha, but when I worked in the oilfield, natural gas was a fossil fuel, also. I don’t have the engineering data in front of me, but a gas burner is a much simpler device than a coal-burning stove. Switching is a no-brainer. Burning natural gas is cheaper, and cleaner. But both will soon go away. Texas is now generating over 30% of its power from wind energy. Yes, Texas, the oil and gas capital of the US.

    [Reply]

    Samantha Solomon

    Samantha Solomon Reply:

    Thanks for your comment, Gordon. You are right, natural gas is a fossil fuel. The language is not clear. I have corrected the article.

    To your point about cost: The cost of conversion is generally estimated to be between $50 and $75 per kilowatt. According to the EIA, coal generated 1,199,986 kilowatts hours of electricity. Converting just half of that capacity would cost about $50 million. On top of that, you have increased pipeline infrastructure needed to provide fuel for all those new plants, also costing tens of millions per project, at least.

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