Will You Be Alive When We Run Out of Oil?



Comments (10)

  1. cdj says:

    Samantha
    I have been told since the 70’s that we will run out of oil and gas in 30 years. Technology has allowed us to access more oil and gas than we ever imagined. I have seen estimates that there is 9 Trillion barrels of recoverable oil in the US alone. I thought it was a crazy idea years ago but Abiotic Oil may be real. How do you explain oil wells that refill and how do you explain oil wells that produce large amounts of oil for 50 years. There is no way you could bury enough plants and animals in a single location to make that happen. If Abiotic oil is real then oil is part of a natural carbon cycle. As long as we don’t exceed the amount of CO2 being converted to oil and gas we are fine.

    [Reply]

    Samantha Solomon

    Samantha Solomon Reply:

    Hi CDJ, thanks very much for your comment. Anything is possible, and it is possible our accepted understanding of the nature of fossil fuels is wrong and they are not a finite source (taking 1,000s of years to produce is finite for all intensive purposes). However, I do think the Abiotic oil theory has been thoroughly debunked.

    [Reply]

  2. n woods says:

    Sea up 43 in in your lifetime- prove it

    It is an economic impossibility that we run out of oil, coal or gas. As any item becomes more scarce the price goes up, demand goes down and substitutes are found.

    [Reply]

    Samantha Solomon

    Samantha Solomon Reply:

    Hi N, thanks for your comment. The number 43 was a typo, please see the explanation in the comment below. As for your second point, you are correct about scarcity driving up the price and spurring a search for replacement fuels. So, as you said, when we do run out oil, coal, or gas, replacement fuels or power generation methods will be used.

    [Reply]

  3. Paul Thiel says:

    Average sea level has risen 43 inches in her lifetime?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_level_rise

    “Sea level rose by 6 cm during the 19th century and 19 cm in the 20th century.”

    So that’s 25 CENTIMETERS (9.84 inches) in the past 215 years. I didn’t know Methuselah was writing poorly-researched “news” articles.

    [Reply]

    Samantha Solomon

    Samantha Solomon Reply:

    Hi Paul, thank you for your comment and for pointing out the inaccuracy. That was a typo. The actual number, based on the BBC’s data analysis, is 3 inches. I have corrected the article.

    [Reply]

  4. Nathan Jedlicka says:

    Samantha,

    Does this take in to account technology advancements? For example more fuel efficient vehicles, electric cars, additional nuclear power plants being built, push for more solar and wind power.

    Thanks for the article.

    Nathan

    [Reply]

    Samantha Solomon

    Samantha Solomon Reply:

    Hi Natham, thank you for your question. As far as I can tell, the estimates are made based on the assumption that our energy use does not change from the way it is today. So, no, it does not take into consideration any improvements in technology or the larger adoption of renewables.

    [Reply]

  5. n woods says:

    as I said it’s an economic impossibility that we run out of any of the three, coal, oil or gas. Man has changed from moving things with his arms and legs, to sledges, to wheeled carts, to animal drawn carts , to steam engines, to petroleum fueled vehicles and we haven’t and won’t run out of any of those power sources, it’s just impossible.

    [Reply]

  6. Giles says:

    Methane is a natural product: supply unlimited.
    Oil petroleum: maybe a limit.
    Diesel fuel can be obtained from Black water supply, unlimited.
    Hydrogen is in abundance.
    Alcohol is a natural product.
    I only went to the University of Life.

    [Reply]

Add Comment