How Your Dumb Car Is Getting Smarter



Comments (9)

  1. Dale says:

    Simple just do not buy a new connected car. Just keep the old one going.

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    Wendy Reply:

    I haven’t been in a car for three years because I can’t afford to keep my own and everyone I know has cars that are ALREADY over-electronified. If I ever do get up enough money to have a car, I’m stuck picking from and ever-dwindling pool of 30+ (maybe 20+ if the car’s exceptional) year-old rustbuckets with fewer and fewer people willing to care for them.

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  2. BHarrison2 says:

    While I do not trust the government very much, I consider the rahter silly paranoid issue of license plate tracking and now the onboard microcomputers on vehicles to be a rather ridiculous and absurd issue. It is like the issue of cell phone tracking . . . yeah all of that MIGHT be useful in criminal investigations; but NOT very PRACTICAL in regard to innocent persons. There might be cases where the info could be used againsted targeted individuals; but it is NOT APPLICABLE against the average citizen.

    This sounds like a paranoia being used to write articles.

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    Wendy Reply:

    You do know that students have successfully overridden door locks, engine ignition, and even triggered the brakes by remote? (Yeah, it was a controlled test to see if they could do it, but how long until some bored kid starts hacking for fun?) And that a disgruntled ex-car dealer hacked the “in case of non-payment” devices on his dealership cars, leaving dozens of owners with cars that wouldn’t start (a function to disable vehicles when their buyers are late with payments) or wouldn’t stop honking their horns (a function to help the repo man find the car if the buyer tries to hide it)? Sure, a cell phone can’t do anything to you, but a car could KILL you if it made the wrong choice, and the people telling it what choice to make are no where near the situation.

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    Tim B Reply:

    Your comment will not flag you for addition to the database of gov. dissenters.

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  3. doncarmen says:

    the building of case law for time immemorial (is that the right word?) is amazing , but the absolutely incredible current capability of data storage on something as big as your pinkie, well that is just scary. Paranoia, I’m not so sure. Criminality can show up in an individual’s life in the most innocent of ways.

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  4. Cynical175 says:

    I’m old enough to have seen what is going. And I don’t trust any government anywhere in the world to have my best interest at heart.

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  5. Average Joe says:

    The Wall Street Journal says? You mean that rag that used to be a respected publication before tabloid king Rupert Murdoch took over. Name one person that has ever been prosecuted for eating at a greasy spoon. This ‘new’ information has only ever been used by local cops and state police. The federal government is protesting the use of privacy information and has laws on the book to prevent ANY federal employee from using information like that against people. It’s the STATE and LOCAL governments that misuse this data.

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    sheepel Reply:

    And what rock have you been hiding under.

    [Reply]

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