Colorado’s Legalization Plan Going Well



Comments (33)

  1. Sandy Ciarmella says:

    I think it is terrible that pot is legal in Colorado. I heard all the hotels smell like pot. I know I will never visit Colorado. Everything is $$$$$$. What is that telling the children growing up? It is a fact that pot leads to other drugs. Is Colorado going to make hard drugs legal next so they can make money? No way would I ever visit Colorado.

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    Just Some Dude Reply:

    Thank goodness you won’t be visiting any time soon, the traffic to get to the mountains on the weekends is already bad enough, especially in the winter time.

    As a person who doesn’t smoke, I was quite opposed to the change in legislation, but seeing how the money would help our schools and infrastructure, it was an alluring proposition for politicians who like to tax and spend as much as possible.

    What I think has had the most profound effect though, is that Colorado no longer needs to incarcerate people for petty marijuana possession. This in turn reduces the burden on the prison system as well as helps to raise tax dollars. That’s a net positive that few seem to have discussed. I can only wonder how many people currently serving out a sentence for something that was illegal before January 1st are still being held in a cell? Might as well let them free and reduce that burden on the state finances a bit, shouldn’t we?

    So, how has life changed in the last 7 months? Honestly, there’s no change. People who smoke weed will find it and do that regardless of their source being legal or under the table. In addition, it’s still illegal to smoke it in public, and surprisingly, most everyone respects that. Now, who knows what’s in someones candy/pastry as they happily munch a bit while walking down the street, but lets be real, who knows what’s in someones water bottle, it could easily be booze and nobody is any the wiser or seems to worry.

    The one thing that the state does need to figure out is how to objectively ascertain whether the operator of a motor vehicle is stoned to the bejezus belt or not, which is currently in work. However, most people who are that stoned probably aren’t going to leave their couch and bag of Funjuns, but you never know.

    So, as tough as this is, I must admit, and this isn’t easy…. maybe I was wrong? Maybe this legalization should have happened years ago. There has been literally zero change in day to day life. There’s no insane aroma of weed lingering on the streets (or on the slopes) and yet the state has found an effective way to make additional income and find a way to get more businesses up and running and spark the local economy… Generally speaking, isn’t that a good thing?

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    JohnB Reply:

    Yes the drug cartels have known for years how much money it makes. no mystery there. So expect to see more hard drugs and people willing to use them as their inhibition break down over a broader base of the Colorado population. Watch for school scores to fall (yes you will have to throw all that money at the schools to get scores up for stoned kids who are now wondering… if marijuana was supposed to be so bad, but isn’t, (?) what about those other cool drugs that they say are so bad? Are those apples we aren’t supposed to bite too? Good luck with that. The devil will always get his due.

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    Aaron Sme Reply:

    The reign of old hypocritical prohibitionists is almost over…The youth of America is tired of your false propaganda, failed political ideas and legalized slavery (Privatized Prison System).

    F A Davis Reply:

    These positive results do not surprise me at all, and my late husband, who was a therapist, advocated legalization for years. There is a certain percentage of the population who will always be self-destructive whether the means is legal or not, and making it illegal does not diminish their use of such substances whether it be alcohol or recreational drugs. Making it legal diminishes the rewards to illegal suppliers, and therefore cuts down on violent crime, the need for policing such practices, and the needless incarceration of users. All good! And the tax revenue is a large bonus.

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    MArk Reply:

    Couldn’t have said it better! Studies have shown that Cannabis is no where near as bad as tobacco and alcohol. The gateway drug rhetoric has been refuted a thousands times. Florida is next! Maybe if we are lucky the close-minded tourists wont come here either! I feel your pain, dude.

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    Colleen Hogan-Mazzola Reply:

    Well said !

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    tom Reply:

    The only real addiction that I’ve ever had is tobacco. It is my gateway drug. When I don’t have MJ I miss it, but when I’m out of cigarettes I panic.

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    Guy Reply:

    You are wrong. Studies say now that ALCOHOL is the gateway drug. In fact, I’ve always been so happy smoking pot that I don’t drink or do any other drugs, while lots of people my age regularly enjoy both. So enjoy being broke and wrong.

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  2. Sharon says:

    Well, neither would I. I can’t stand the smell of the stuff. However, it looks like Colorado won’t be needing tourists. I find it difficult to believe hotels allow guests to smoke marijuana in their hotels. Most quality hotels don’t allow smoking cigarettes in them, so I find it hard to believe they would all be allowing people to smoke pot. The smell is just as offensive to me as cigarettes are. Happy for them that so far, it’s working out for them. I’ve never traveled to Colorado and have no plans to anyway so it’s no skin off my nose.

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  3. Colleen Hogan-Mazzola says:

    As a mother, and a teacher, I think this is disgraceful. What does this teach our children ? This is an ethical and moral question for this country. Don’t fund my salary with drug money ! I am a Public School Teacher and proud of it. I am a Democrat and proud of it. I am not proud of the message we are sending the children and young adults in this country. How does a parent parent and a teacher teach when this is allowed ?

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    James Folan Reply:

    “What does this teach our children ?”

    It teaches them that their God given rights trump your big brother statist laws that you have no right shoving down other peoples throats. This is an ethical and moral issue for this country, the choices are to let people live their lives without declaring some inane “war” on them, or to think some socialists should decide for us how we can live.

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    MArk Reply:

    Maybe if we actually teach our children moderation they will have a better understanding of the world we live in. They are exposed to drugs either way. Growing up it was 100x times easier to get Cannabis than alcohol. I was taught very young about abuse and addiction: my father being an alcoholic, it was a common life lesson. Cannabis is far safer than alcohol and tobacco, so by funding private prions, spending billions on prohibition, and allowing cartels to thrive is far worse than children thinking the generation before it wasn’t honest.

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  4. ROBERT AHRENDT says:

    ‘POT’ can be addictive, just as Coffee can be, but pain relief and Psychic Trauma relief from ‘POT’ is unmatched by any DRUG offered by the Pharmaceutical Industry. My experience has been that use of ‘POT’ is not costly by any measure of economics or social values. The use has been going on for over 3,000 years in many regions of this Earth and other Galactic entities. Stop being a shlub and relax and enjoy LIFE.

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  5. Patton says:

    I believe that all the revenue from legalized pot is blood money…it IS a gateway drug that which I have learned from experience.
    The really sad thing is all the years spent teaching the kids to ‘just say no’ is so hypocritical now.
    To just give in to the war on drugs goes against everything America stands for.
    I guess it shouldn’t be too surprising considering our so-called (P)resident and his administration.
    There is a reason marijuana is called dope…those who use it are dopey, and detached from reality-what better way to ultimately take control of a society than to help people drug themselves into stupidity.

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    Bobby Reply:

    I find your comment (or rather, blame) curious or at best puzzling. I was under the impression that the decision to legalize recreational marijuana was made by the people(voters) of Colorado and it’s politicians not the (P)resident. I find it odd how all you righties push for “state’s rights until it’s something that you don’t agree with, then it is blamed on this (P)resident. If you have the ability to think, how about using this ability before you speak.

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    wilie Kingfish Reply:

    It is ignorant people like her that complain about weed. Drinking makes a lot of people go nuts and not give any thought to what they do. Weed is not addicting, and mellows most people. Also, anyone that I ever have known will drive much slower, but the booze makes them very dangerous.
    As far as a gateway drug ? No way. Booze is more of a gateway drug. People who think that weed is so bad already have a problem: a very weak mind, and have to blame their screwing up on weed, as if they did not know any better.

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    Tim O Reply:

    Patton,
    By your logic, the prohibition on alcohol, the war in Vietnam, and even segregation should have all been continued because they were at one time policies that we thought necessary and effective. Societal intelligence does not mean coming up with the right solution the first time, it means moving toward the right solution eventually. That we fought the “war on drugs” and said “just say no”, does not mean that we should continue those policies in perpetuity because we’re to proud to admit when we were wrong. I’m not going to say that lifting the prohibition is the best strategy, because I cannot possibly know that. I do know that our previous strategy was failing miserably, and that there are good historical examples to suggest that this experiment may help more than it hurts. So, let’s see what happens, and change our future policies based on the cool-headed analysis of facts and evidence.

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  6. james thompson says:

    As a frequents user of marijuana since the age of 14 the war on drugs is a failure. There are many arguments that can speak of to advocate the legalization of marijuana but in this comment I will choose one which is the arguments that it sends the wrong message to kids and will lead to easier access and use of minors. This is just false. Marijuana is already available easily for minors to find on the streets. The fact is drug dealers don’t ask for age businesses do. As a user of marijuana as a teen I can tell you first hand that marijuana was easier to obtain than alcohol because I was a minor. Now for the message to kids. The same approuch should be taken as america has done with cigerettes. America has record new lows for underage tobacoo use as well as adult use. How did we do this? We educated the public about the use and the harmfull sideffects of them not by making cigerettes illegal. So if you ask me if you want to protect kids from using marijuana then the logical choice would be to legitimize it so they can’t buy it by eliminating the black market which prohibition created. As far as calling the tax revenue blood money well I guess by this logic then the tax revenue from liquor and tobacoo sales is also blood money because the reality is that many schools around the nation already receives funding from these taxes yet we don’t call that blood money. And lastly as far as a gateway drug I’ve used for marijuana ten years and I am proud to say that I am a second year law student and have not done any hard drugs in my life. Gateway drug is an old argument that everyone knows is false.

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  7. Carol says:

    I am so glad not to live there. I believe that revenue may be coming in now but in time they will be using the money for law suites. Has anyone ever thought of a pilot using and than flying, or over the road truck drivers, etc.? What will happen when people become addicted and use harder drugs? Is this what our college students use to make it thru the day and on school property? Parents having their children view this all around them?
    In time, crime and disaster will strike!

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    Melissa, Florida Reply:

    I feel it is this simple: if you live there, enjoy it. For those of you who have opinions about a state you do not reside in or have never visited, then you should only be worried about the state you DO live in. Oh, and for your last comment, the only thing that’s going to strike is a nerve in your brain after you see the results of it curing all forms in all stages of cancer. You really should research marijuana before you rely on feedback from others.

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    wilie Kingfish Reply:

    Your thinking, if you could call it that, is so far out there. Just like any other substance it can lead to abuse, but only by weak minded people. You do not need a drink or a smoke before driving or going to work. It is something you do when you are done for the day and kick back and enjoy your time to rest before another day of work or whatever. But it should be up to the individual and no one else. Also in the privacy of your home.

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    Bucky Reply:

    And yall really think that if a 16 year old wants to smoke they can’t find it illegally now? Do you lock up your liquor cabinet? medicine cabinet? Then it is stupid to think that your kids are safe as it is.
    Vote no and you vote yes for the cartels… Your tax dollars to fight the endless and useless war.
    Nobody has ever been shown to die from marijuana. How many have died from aspirin overdose??? Lock that up, too! Get a card to buy baby aspirin!!!
    If someone wants to smoke, they will get it! PERIOD!

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  8. James says:

    So the crime rate has dropped?? Guess the criminals are too stoned to care about causing a problem.

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  9. Fran says:

    One could only hope that the rest of the country wakes up pays attention and does the same, and we can again be the prosperous country we once were. And I think it’s only the beginning. People of this country need to take back the country and tell these people that we elect in our government where to step off! Those people work for us! They are not our bosses or our Lord’s, they work for us. And they need to be reminded on a daily basis!!!

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  10. Joseph Mertens says:

    The only reason marijuana can be called a “Gateway Drug” is that it is harmless. After whomever tries it finds out the drug dealer can offer other drugs the person wonders if those drugs are also harmless and the Government is BS-ing about them as well.
    All these poor illogical people imagining ludicrous “What IF scenarios” to justify endless police brutality, invasion of privacy, theft by government in “Civilian forfeiture”, the incarceration of 1.2 million people for a victim less crime… it is just so sad.

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  11. Anna says:

    Interesting the first thing said is the money will be used for education. I am pretty sure kids will be stoned in school from getting their parents stuff because they are doing it now. What happened is that liberal drug users from California moved into Colorado and started changing the laws, etc. to suit themselves and not those already living there. Right now in our state if kids want it they have to travel to certain areas of the city or certain individuals on their streets or get it from their parents. Now in that state it is available all over like alcohol is right where all the kids can get it. The money will not be used for education, it will be used by families trying to save their kids in institutions just like families are doing now except it will be in much bigger numbers. Dope just doesn’t effect the user, it effects the family members. As a taxpayer I am not interested in supporting drug rehab places and the users, I want my taxes to actually go into teaching kids math, science, etc. to get a good job, not go into getting kids clean so they can hold down a job they can barely handle because many kids like my neighbor once addicted can’t break the habit and end up killing themselves with their father’s gun and doing it in our backyard instead of their own backyard. Give it a few years. Now, the users are happy and sleepy, next they will be in line waiting for the stores to open up so they can get through the day. Next they will be sitting on the sidewalks because money went to the stores not their rent.

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  12. Muhit says:

    I’m not sure where the writer got his info about tax revenue exceeding expectations. I believed that the June forecast severely cuts back anticipated tax revenue compared to what was forecasted just three months earlier. And May showed the first (could it be?!) drop in monthly pot sales! Once anyone can grow (and they get around to it!) the market will likely, shrink. I think decriminalizing pot is a great thing. But I don’t know that making it easy to become potheads is so great.

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  13. neutral man says:

    whats gets me the most is that times are changing, and it seems to me that everyone that is against that change are still stuck back in the 50s. come on people, i know its hard to admit and realize that times are different now, but it is time to grow up and accept that we are in a new era, and it is changing whether you all like it or not.

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  14. Gale Edward Boulton MA says:

    I was very pleased to see that Colorado, the state of my birth, has chosen to take the wise measure of legalizing Marijuana. Compared to alcohol, Pot is way down the scale in causing car accidents and resulting in violent crimes. It is not a major factor in lung cancer as is cigarette smoking, which is a heavy hooker. Surg.Gen.Dr.Everett Koop, “9 X as addictive as heroin.” I am age 90, and fortunate to not be in constant pain as are so many older people. If so, I would welcome legalization in CA. My #1 reason in getting to 90 is I AVOID PRESCRIPTION drugs. Including flu shots, now I don’t get flu anymore.
    Who REALLY wants to keep Marijuana illegal? The MAFIA (and Big Pharma) which has been USING The Moralists to keep the stuff illegal. Pot was legal ’til 1937, nobody used it except jazz musicians and Mexican kids. It was a non-issue.
    Pharmacies, not yet taken over by the legal drug pushers, BIG PHARMA, had Cannabis in those Gold Trimmed white ceramic jars along with other herbs, you could buy it OTC like Echinacea or Cascara Sagrada. Then the DRUG companies replaced the herbal pharmacopeia with their lethal chemicals.

    Now with pot being illegal in California, we have drug gangs killing each other, just like Chicago in Prohibition. Said to be California’s largest cash crop, wouldn’t we be wise to legalize it AND TAX it? We could eliminate our MULTI-BILLION$ debt in a year or two. And NOT go on building prisons for people who are incarcerated for victimless crimes. It is so sad, so is all the suffering caused. Californians, get smart:
    LEGALIZE MARIJUANA!

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  15. Budsmokaaaa says:

    I guess everyone will pack up and leave Florida to go to Colorado and have legal pot.

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  16. Young Blood says:

    i think that colorado made a good decisoion legalizing cannabis because their making tha mula $$$ big time
    congrats colorado

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  17. La Buscador says:

    If the money from marijuana sales is to be used for educating our kids, where did the money go that was supposed to educate our kids?

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