Why Nintendo’s Next-Generation Wii is a Dud



Comments (5)

  1. Derrick says:

    I think you are looking at it from the point of view of someone who is simply not a video game player, possibly one of the many parents/grandparents who bought the Wii based solely on seeing Wii Sports. The first point you make completely ignores three points: 1) the form is not yet set in stone and it was mentioned it may change, 2) it brings additional functionality but the Wii U still works with your Wii-motes so they aren’t going anywhere, 3) while it supports motion control it won’t be used as a Wii-mote replacement thus motions like that will be left to Wii-motes. Your second point ignores how, in the very same demo you mentioned, the new controller mirrors what’s on the screen based on the controller placement so you aren’t missing anything, not to mention the fact that it is only one example of almost limitless applications. Finally, while it may look like a tablet based on when it was first put into development and the remarks of its creator it is not meant to be a tablet, it is a game controller that shares similar superficial features it’s purpose is to enhance your video game experience and unfortunately journalist like yourself propagating misinformation only goes to confuse consumers as to the actual concept of the product. Please, as a gamer, consumer, and an investor I humbly request you put a bit more research into your predictive writings while I respect your opinion the “facts” you sight are either horribly slanted or flat out false.

    [Reply]

    Justin Fritz Reply:

    As I wrote in my article, I’m an avid video gamer – and certainly not a grandparent.

    The form factor of the remote might change, but unless they can make it look and weigh exactly like the original it’s not good enough (in my opinion of course). And since they’re “stuffing it with features so it can do anything,” I’d say it’s not getting much slimmer.

    If the screen “mirrors” the TV screen, why have it at all? It just gives you tunnel vision. Which perhaps some people might like. And I don’t recall saying that it was the only application.

    I didn’t call it a tablet. Others did. I merely pointed out how its inability to act as a standalone device means it won’t replace tablets. So I think we’re in agreement there

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  2. Observer says:

    While I certainly don’t think its success is by any means guaranteed, some of your hypothesis is flawed. First, you still use Wii remotes with the Wii-U…so no reason to use the new controller for a bat or golf club. Secondly, while the 3DS certainly hasn’t sold like gangbusters…it hasn’t gone through a single holiday season. Its way too early to call it a failure…review your Nintendo history…the original DS started way slower and then really took off. We are one holiday season and maybe a price cut from a relatively widespread adoption.

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    Justin Fritz Reply:

    My point about the control form factor is that it’s no longer something you can use without thinking about it. And from what I’ve seen of motion controlled games with the new controller, they should have stuck with what worked. I wouldn’t say the 3DS is a failure either. But it did fail to meet expectations.

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    Another Observer Reply:

    All controllers require a learning curve before operation becomes instinctive. Nintendo isn’t stupid enough to spam a screen with unorganized buttons. Something tells me you forgot what learning to use any other controller felt like.

    [Reply]

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